Central California and 2019 Point-in-Time Homeless Count Results

–U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
will post official results in the fall– 

–Recent Homeless Count Reports Reveal an Estimated 20% Increase
in the Number of Homeless Persons Counted in
Central California in 2019– 

–Regional Convening in Central Valley Next Month and
Working Groups will be Appointed–

While we await the official homeless count results from HUD, recent reports made available by Central California Continuums of Care (CoCs) provide an estimate of the number of persons counted by all the Central California CoCs earlier this year, which is approximately 12,500 or 20% more persons than those counted in 2017 as noted in the table below.

HUD requires CoCs to conduct unsheltered counts every other year or odd-number years, which is the reason for comparing the 2019 count results to 2017 instead of 2018. Only half (48.8%) or 21 of the 43 California CoCs conducted an unsheltered count in 2018. All CoCs are required by HUD to conduct a sheltered count every year.

Central California

Central California is defined for this report as the middle third of the state of California from east to west and the middle third of the state from north to south. The region consists of the following sixteen counties:

Alpine Merced
Amador Mono
Calaveras Monterey
Fresno San Benito
Inyo San Joaquin
Kings Stanislaus
Madera Tulare
Mariposa Tuolumne

 

Map of central California Continuums of Care

 

Click here to access a full resolution PDF of this map

 

Central California Continuums of Care

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has divided the 16-county region defined for this report into eight (8) continuums of care (CoCs), which are defined by HUD “as the planning body responsible for meeting the goals of the Continuum of Care (CoC) program.” The purpose of the CoC program, as stated by HUD

“is to promote communitywide commitment to the goal of ending homelessness; provide funding for efforts by nonprofit providers, and State and local governments to quickly rehouse homeless individuals and families while minimizing the trauma and dislocation caused to homeless individuals, families, and communities by homelessness; promote access to and effective utilization of mainstream programs by homeless individuals and families; and optimize self-sufficiency among individuals and families experiencing homelessness.”

The 8 continuums of care (CoC) include:

  • CA-506 Salinas/Monterey, San Benito Counties CoC;
  • CA-510 Turlock, Modesto/Stanislaus County CoC;
  • CA-511 Stockton/San Joaquin County CoC;
  • CA-513 Visalia/Kings, Tulare Counties CoC;
  • CA-514 Fresno and Madera Counties CoC;
  • CA-520 Merced County CoC;
  • CA-526 Tuolumne, Amador, Calaveras, & Mariposa Counties CoC; and
  • CA-530 Alpine, Inyo, and Mono Counties CoC.

Increase in Point-in-Time Homelessness

The number of persons counted in late January, 2019 was 12,500 adults and children according to the recent reports made available by Central California CoCs, which is an increase of 2,122 persons or 20.4% when compared to the number of persons counted in 2017 as noted in Table 1 below.

Table 1. Comparison of 2017 and 2019 Homeless Counts for All Central California CoCs

 

CoCs

2017 Homeless Count 2019 Homeless Count  

Difference

# %
CA-506 Monterey and San Benito Counties CoC 3,364 2,704 -660 -19.6
CA-510 Stanislaus County CoC 1,661 1,923 +262 +15.8
CA-511 San Joaquin County CoC 1,542 2,629 +1,087 +70.5
CA-513 Kings and Tulare Counties CoC 853 1,069 +216 +25.3
CA-514 Fresno and Madera Counties CoC 2,016 2,508 +492 +24.4
CA-520 Merced County CoC 454 608 +154 +33.9
CA-526 Tuolumne, Amador, Calaveras, and Mariposa Counties CoC 367 845 +478 +130
CA-530 Alpine, Inyo, and Mono Counties CoC 121 214 +93 +76.9

Totals:

10,378 12,500 2,122 20.4

Seven (7) of the 8 CoCs counted more persons in 2019 than in 2017. The only CoC that counted less was the Monterey and San Benito Counties CoC.

The 7 CoCs that experienced an increase counted a total of 9,796 persons in 2019, which represents an increase of 2,782 persons or 39.6% when compared to the number of adults and children counted in 2017.

Table 2 only includes the 7 CoCs that experienced an increase.

Table 2. Comparison of 2017 and 2019 Homeless Counts for 7 Central California CoCs That Experienced an Increase

 

CoCs

2017 Homeless Count 2019 Homeless Count  

Difference

# %
CA-510 Stanislaus County CoC 1,661 1,923 +262 +15.8
CA-511 San Joaquin County CoC 1,542 2,629 +1,087 +70.5
CA-513 Kings and Tulare Counties CoC 853 1,069 +216 +25.3
CA-514 Fresno and Madera Counties CoC 2,016 2,508 +492 +24.4
CA-520 Merced County CoC 454 608 +154 +33.9
CA-526 Tuolumne, Amador, Calaveras, and Mariposa Counties CoC 367 845 +478 +130
CA-530 Alpine, Inyo, and Mono Counties CoC 121 214 +93 +76.9

Totals:

7,014

9,796 2,782

39.6

Next Steps

California Governor Gavin Newsom announced in May, 2019 the formation of the Homeless and Supportive Housing Advisory Task Force, which will be co-chaired by Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg and Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas. Last month, the Governor announced the other Task Force members.

Task Force members will “will advise the Administration on solutions to address the state’s homelessness epidemic” and “assist local governments in crafting their regional strategies to address homelessness, with a particular focus on homelessness prevention and early intervention.”

First Regional Convening in the Central Valley

The Task Force will hold “three regional convenings in the months ahead including one in September in the Central Valley. A convening in Southern California and another in Northern California are planned for the fall. Exact dates and locations will be announced closer to the meeting times.

Working Groups will be Appointed

Also, the Governor

announced plans to appoint working groups of other regional leaders, service providers, formerly homeless people and academics around specific geographies or issues affecting homelessness, to work in collaboration with these (Task Force) advisors. These working groups may include experts on mental health, street homelessness or rural homelessness. Selection of working groups will be made in the coming weeks.”

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1 Comment

  1. Gregorio Barboza on August 13, 2019 at 4:07 pm

    Of the people experiencing homelessness how many are US Veteran’s. Of these veterans, what years or conflict did they serve?

    gregorio.barboza@gmail.com

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