Reserving Homeless Housing, Assistance, & Prevention Program (HHAP) Funding for Morbidity/Mortality Prevention

–Homeless persons left languishing on the streets with life-threatening and terminal illnesses
Has become a burgeoning crisis throughout the State of California–

–If each jurisdiction dedicated at least 10% of its non-competitive allocation of
HHAP funding, a collective $65 million could be committed to morbidity/mortality prevention–

(estimates of HHAP Funding by Urban Initiatives for counties, large cities, and continuums of care are listed in the tables below—official amounts by the state will soon be released)

During the coming months, the Homeless Housing, Assistance, and Prevention Program (HHAP) will provide an additional $650 million for homeless assistance to California counties, largest cities, and continuums of care. A Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) is scheduled to be released by the end of the year and submission of applications for the non-competitive and allocated funds are due to the state by February 15, 2020.

Each jurisdiction has an opportunity to reserve an appropriate amount of HHAP funding that can be spent over five years for homeless persons languishing on the streets with life-threatening and terminal illnesses and especially for those who have also been aging on the streets.

Life-threatening Illnesses

Life-threatening illnesses are chronic and often incurable and have the effect of limiting a person’s ability to carry out daily physical needs and reducing a person’s life expectancy. Such illnesses include diabetes, neurological conditions including Parkinson’s disease and dementia, and heart disease.

Terminal Illnesses

Terminal illnesses or progressive end-stage diseases are incurable and expected to result in premature death. Cancer, advanced heart disease, leukemia, HIV/AIDS, and chronic lung conditions are some of these progressive diseases.

Aging on the Streets

A preponderance of research on aging on the streets has revealed that Adults age 55 and older who are homeless have mortality rates four times higher than the general population. Also, cognitive and mobility impairments are likely to increase for seniors while languishing on the streets.

Homeless Prevention

Directing HHAP funding can also include designating funds to prevent persons with life-threatening and terminal illnesses from becoming homeless.

Eligible Activities

Eligible activities within the HHAP Program for morbidity/mortality prevention include

1. Outreach and coordination to assist vulnerable populations in accessing permanent housing stability in supportive housing;
2. Systems support for activities necessary to create regional partnerships and maintain a homeless services and housing delivery system;
3. Rental assistance and rapid rehousing;
4. Landlord Incentives (including, but not limited to, security deposits and holding fees); and
5. Prevention and shelter diversion to permanent housing.

Obligating and Expending Funds

HHAP Program legislation provides an opportunity to reserve an appropriate amount of HHAP funding that can be spent over five years for morbidity/mortality prevention as noted in number 3 below.

1. CoCs and large cities must contractually obligate no less than 50% of program allocations on or before May 31, 2023;
2. Counties must contractually obligate their full program allocation on or before May 31, 2023; and
3. funds must be fully expended by June 30, 2025.

Morbidity/Mortality Prevention: Implications for Next Steps

Supplement not Supplant

As stated on page 4 in the Homeless Housing, Assistance and Prevention Program (HHAP) Program Guidance,

“program recipients shall not use HHAP program funding to supplant existing local funds for homeless housing, assistance, or prevention. The intent of HHAP program funds is to expand or increase services and housing capacity. HHAP funds cannot replace local funds that are committed to an existing or developing homeless assistance program. However, if funds previously supporting a service or project end or are reduced for reasons beyond the control of the grantee and services or housing capacity will be lost as a result of these funds ending, HHAP program funds may be used to maintain the service or program and are not considered supplanting. Examples include, but are not limited to, a time-limited city and/or county tax or one-time block grant, such as HEAP.”

Thus, current services to unsheltered persons should be supplemented and not supplanted.

Establish an Initiative

Establishing a Morbidity/Mortality Prevention Initiative that supplements current services and resources for unsheltered persons by designating an appropriate amount of HHAP funds targeted specifically for homeless persons languishing on the streets with life-threatening and terminal illnesses and especially for those who have also been aging on the streets.

Reserve Appropriate Amount of HHAP Funds

An appropriate amount of HHAP funds should be reserved by counties, largest cities, and continuums of care through the HHAP legislative allowable timeframe of June 30, 2025 for morbidity/mortality prevention.

If each jurisdiction dedicated at least 10% of its non-competitive allocation of HHAP funding, a collective $65 million could be committed to morbidity/mortality prevention statewide as noted in the tables below.

Funding Allocations

As noted within the HHAP legislation, a county, large city, and continuum of care’s allocation will be based on the proportionate share of the total homeless population of the jurisdiction according to the 2019 homeless point-in-time count.

The official 2019 homeless point-in-time count will soon be released by the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), which will allow the state to designate the official allocated amount of HHAP fund for each jurisdiction.

Urban Initiatives is able to provide an unofficial estimate of allocated HHAP funds for each county, large city, and continuum of care after obtaining 2019 homeless point-in-time count data from continuums of care or through the media.

Continuums of Care

The following table provides an unofficial estimate of allocated funds for each continuum of care and 10% of the amount which could be set aside for morbidity/mortality prevention.

Table 1. Continuums of Care and Estimated HHAP Allocation

Continuum of Care

Unofficial Estimated Allocated Funds

10%
of Funds

CA-500San Jose/Santa Clara City & County CoC$12,200,000$1,220,000
CA-501San Francisco CoC$10,100,000$1,010,000
CA-502Oakland, Berkeley/Alameda County CoC$10,100,000$1,010,000
CA-503Sacramento City & County CoC$7,000,000$700,000
CA-504Santa Rosa, Petaluma/Sonoma County CoC$3,700,000$370,000
CA-505Richmond/Contra Costa County CoC$2,900,000$290,000
CA-506Salinas/Monterey, San Benito Counties CoC$3,400,000$340,000
CA-507Marin County CoC$1,300,000$130,000
CA-508Watsonville/Santa Cruz City & County CoC$2,700,000$270,000
CA-509Mendocino County CoC$810,000$81,000
CA-510Turlock, Modesto/Stanislaus County CoC$2,400,000$240,000
CA-511Stockton/San Joaquin County CoC$3,300,000$330,000
CA-512Daly City/San Mateo County CoC$1,900,000$190,000
CA-513Visalia/Kings, Tulare Counties CoC$1,300,000$130,000
CA-514Fresno City & County/Madera County CoC$3,100,000$310,000
CA-515Roseville, Rocklin/Placer County CoC$1,300,000$130,000
CA-516Redding/Shasta County CoC$1,600,000$160,000
CA-517Napa City & County CoC$500,000$50,000
CA-518Vallejo/Solano County CoC$1,500,000$150,000
CA-519Chico, Paradise/Butte County CoC$1,600,000$160,000
CA-520Merced City & County CoC$800,000$80,000
CA-521Davis, Woodland/Yolo County CoC$800,000$80,000
CA-522Humboldt County CoC$1,800,000$180,000
CA-523Colusa, Glen, Trinity Counties CoC*$500,000$50,000
CA-524Yuba City/Sutter County CoC$900,000$90,000
CA-525El Dorado County CoC$800,000$80,000
CA-526Tuolumne, Amador, Calaveras, Mariposa Counties CoC$1,100,000$110,000
CA-527Tehama County CoC$500,000$50,000
CA-529Lake County CoC*$500,000$50,000
CA-530Alpine, Inyo, Mono Counties CoC$500,000$50,000
CA-531Nevada County CoC$1,300,000$130,000
CA-600Los Angeles City & County CoC$70,100,000$7,010,000
CA-601San Diego City and County CoC$10,200,000$1,020,000
CA-602Santa Ana, Anaheim/Orange County CoC$8,600,000$860,000
CA-603Santa Maria/Santa Barbara County CoC$2,300,000$230,000
CA-604Bakersfield/Kern County CoC$1,700,000$170,000
CA-606Long Beach CoC$2,400,000$240,000
CA-607Pasadena CoC$700,000$70,000
CA-608Riverside City & County CoC$3,500,000$350,000
CA-609San Bernardino City & County CoC$3,300,000$330,000
CA-611Oxnard, San Buenaventura/Ventura County CoC$2,100,000$210,000
CA-612Glendale CoC$500,000$50,000
CA-613Imperial County CoC$1,800,000$180,000
CA-614San Luis Obispo County CoC$1,400,000$140,000

The following table provides an unofficial estimate of allocated funds for each county and 10% of the amount which could be set aside for morbidity/mortality prevention.

Table 2. Counties and Estimated HHAP Allocation

Counties

Unofficial Estimated Allocated Funds

 

10%
of Funds

Santa Clara County11,290,0001,129,000
San Francisco9,319,000931,900
Alameda County9,331,000933,100
Sacramento County6,479,000647,900
Sonoma County3,433,000343,300
Contra Costa County2,670,000267,000
Monterey, San Benito Counties CoC3,141,000314,100
Marin County CoC1,203,000120,300
Santa Cruz County2,521,000252,100
Mendocino County750,00075,000
Stanislaus County2,237,000223,700
San Joaquin County3,058,000305,800
San Mateo County1,759,000175,900
Kings, Tulare Counties1,243,000124,300
Fresno Madera Counties2,917,000291,700
Placer County594,00059,400
Shasta County1,453,000145,300
Napa County376,00037,600
Solano County1,339,000133,900
Butte County1,525,000152,500
Merced County707,00070,700
Yolo County762,00076,200
Humboldt County1,713,000171,300
Colusa, Glen, Trinity Counties223,00022,300
Sutter County821,00082,100
El Dorado County750,00075,000
Tuolumne, Amador, Calaveras, Mariposa Counties983,00098,300
Tehama County327,00032,700
Lake County433,00043,300
Alpine, Inyo, Mono Counties249,00024,900
Nevada County594,00059,400
Los Angeles County68,556,0006,855,600
San Diego County9,424,000924,400
Orange County7,980,000798,000
Santa Barbara County2,097,000209,700
Kern County1,547,000154,700
Riverside County3,270,000327,000
San Bernardino County3,033,000303,300
Ventura County1,941,000194,100
Imperial County1,644,000164,400
San Luis Obispo County1,309,000130,900

The following table provides an unofficial estimate of allocated funds for each large city and 10% of the amount which could be set aside for morbidity/mortality prevention.

Table 3. Large Cities and Estimated HHAP Allocation

 

 

Large Cities (General population of 300,000+)

Unofficial Estimated Allocated Funds

 

10%
of Funds

Los Angeles123,750,00012,375,000
San Diego21,333,0002,133,300
San Jose25,556,0002,555,600
San Francisco21,093,0002,109,300
Oakland21,122,0002,112,200
Santa Ana9,031,000903,100
Anaheim9,031,000903,100
Sacramento14,666,0001,466,600
Fresno6,604,000660,400
Long Beach4,987,000498,700
Bakersfield3,502,000350,200
Riverside7,401,000740,100
Stockton6,922,000692,200

Leave a Comment