Spending $100 Million to Mitigate the Spread of COVID-19 among Persons Experiencing Homelessness in California

–Funds were awarded to California’s 13 largest cities,
44 continuums of care, and 58 counties which are noted in the tables below—

–Evolving next steps are also noted below–

On March 18, 2020, California allocated $100 million in emergency funding the day after Governor Newsom signed Senate Bill 89, which was approved unanimously by the state Legislature, “to support local governments to protect the health and safety of homeless populations, reduce the spread of COVID-19 in homeless populations, and provide safe beds for people experiencing homelessness.”

California’s 13 largest cities, including cities that are also a county, received nearly $43 million, the state’s 44 Continuums of Care (CoCs) received nearly $30 million, and the state’s 58 counties received approximately $27 million. See tables 1 – 3 below for breakdown by award for 13 largest cities, 44 CoCs, and 58 counties.

The Executive Order signed by the Governor specifically stated

“the emergency of COVID-19 necessitates a more focused approach, including emergency protective measures to bring unsheltered Californians safely indoors, expand shelter capacity, maintain health and sanitation standards and institute medically indicated interventions, and add new isolation and quarantine capacity to California’s shelter and housing inventory to slow the spread of the pandemic.”

As a result, award recipients have begun to use the funding to take significant steps to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 among persons experiencing homelessness, which include:

• Establishing isolation and quarantine space for asymptomatic, symptomatic (awaiting test results), confirmed positive, and high-risk chronically ill older persons by securing or transforming community spaces including hotels/motels, recreation centers, convention centers, trailers, schools, and other public places;
• Providing transportation and trained staff for individuals when needed to isolation and quarantine spaces;
• Delivering services while persons are in isolation and quarantine spaces such as health, mental health, and trauma care.

Evolving Resources for Next Steps

Homebase provides an excellent COVID-19 Response Online Resource Guide, which is regularly updated to help award recipients rapidly but safely take the steps to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 among persons experiencing homelessness. The Guide is a summary and index of key resources provided by a wide-range of institutions and organizations that include:

• California Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency;
• California Department of Public Health;
• Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;
• Corporation for Supportive Housing;
• Harm Reduction Coalition;
• Los Angeles County Department of Public Health;
• National Alliance to End Homelessness;
• National Health Care for the Homeless Council;
• National Low Income Housing Coalition
• National Network to End Domestic Violence;
• Public Health Department – Seattle & King County;
• Street Medicine Institute;
• Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA);
• U.S. Department of Health and Human Services;
• U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development;
• U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs;
• U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness;
• University of California, San Francisco.

Homebase has compiled several publications of their own.

Table 1. 13 Largest Cities and Awards

13 Largest CitiesAward
Anaheim$1,385,224.15
Bakersfield$537,127.73
Fresno$1,012,869.44
Long Beach$764,902.20
Los Angeles$19,335,937.50
Oakland$3,239,728.32
Riverside$1,135,237.64
Sacramento$2,245,840.09
San Diego *$3,699,315.81
San Francisco$3,244,978.44
San Jose$3,919,820.88
Santa Ana$1,385,224.15
Stockton$1,062,543.66
Total:$42,968,750.01

Table 2. 58 Counties and Awards

58 CountiesAward
Alameda$1,438,315.56
Alpine$10,000.00
Amador †$38,369.43
Butte$226,989.22
Calaveras †$33,349.13
Colusa$10,040.60
Contra Costa$411,485.19
Del Norte$32,990.53
El Dorado$109,908.68
Fresno$382,080.59
Glenn$10,219.89
Humboldt$305,162.44
Imperial †$253,345.78
Inyo †$25,997.98
Kern$238,464.19
Kings$44,824.09
Lake$73,152.92
Lassen$10,000.00
Los Angeles$10,567,011.44
Madera$67,594.74
Marin$185,392.46
Mariposa †$10,757.78
Mendocino$140,747.66
Merced$109,012.20
Modoc$10,000.00
Mono †$12,371.45
Monterey$434,076.54
Napa$57,733.43
Nevada$74,408.00
Orange$1,229,973.17
Placer$110,625.87
Plumas$10,000.00
Riverside$504,002.12
Sacramento$997,067.17
San Benito$50,740.88
San Bernardino$467,425.66
San Diego *$1,642,354.84
San Francisco$1,440,646.41
San Joaquin$471,728.78
San Luis Obispo$265,896.53
San Mateo$271,096.13
Santa Barbara$323,271.37
Santa Clara$1,740,250.66
Santa Cruz$388,535.25
Shasta$148,278.11
Sierra$10,000.00
Siskiyou$41,058.87
Solano$206,370.13
Sonoma$529,103.62
Stanislaus$344,786.94
Sutter$52,533.84
Tehama$51,637.36
Trinity$14,164.41
Tulare †$145,947.25
Tuolumne †$69,029.11
Ventura$299,245.66
Yolo$117,439.13
Yuba$76,738.85
Total:$27,343,750.04

Table 3. 44 Continuums of Care and Awards

Continuum of CareAward
Alpine, Inyo, Mono Counties CoC$41,704.69
Amador, Calaveras, Mariposa, Tuolumne Counties CoC$164,675.04
Bakersfield/Kern County CoC$259,192.67
Chico, Paradise/Butte County CoC †$246,720.24
Colusa, Glenn, Trinity Counties CoC$37,417.29
Daly/San Mateo County CoC †$294,661.14
Davis, Woodland/Yolo County CoC$127,647.52
El Dorado County CoC$119,462.49
Fresno City & County/Madera County CoC$488,763.33
Glendale CoC$47,356.26
Humboldt County CoC$331,688.67
Imperial County CoC$275,367.85
Lake County CoC$79,511.74
Long Beach CoC$369,105.96
Los Angeles City & County CoC$10,963,460.30
Marin County CoC$201,507.69
Mendocino County CoC$152,982.14
Merced City & County CoC$118,488.08
Napa City & County CoC †$62,751.91
Nevada County CoC$80,875.91
Oakland, Berkeley/Alameda County CoC †$1,563,341.07
Oxnard, San Buenaventura/Ventura County CoC$325,257.57
Pasadena CoC$105,625.89
Redding/Shasta, Siskiyou, Lassen, Plumas, Del Norte, Modoc, Sierra Counties CoC$262,895.43
Richmond/Contra Costa County CoC †$447,253.52
Riverside City & County CoC$547,812.48
Roseville, Rocklin/Placer County CoC$120,242.01
Sacramento City & County CoC$1,083,737.18
Salinas/Monterey, San Benito Counties CoC$526,960.14
San Bernardino City & County CoC$508,056.61
San Diego City and County CoC *$1,785,116.45
San Francisco CoC$1,565,874.53
San Jose/Santa Clara City & County CoC$1,891,521.87
San Luis Obispo County CoC$289,009.57
Santa Ana, Anaheim/Orange County CoC$1,336,888.52
Santa Maria/Santa Barbara County CoC$351,371.72
Santa Rosa, Petaluma/Sonoma County CoC$575,095.92
Stockton/San Joaquin County CoC$512,733.78
Tehama County CoC$56,125.93
Turlock, Modesto/Stanislaus County CoC$374,757.53
Vallejo/Solano County CoC$224,308.85
Visalia/Kings, Tulare Counties CoC$207,354.14
Watsonville/Santa Cruz City & County CoC$422,308.66
Yuba City & County/Sutter County CoC$140,509.71
Total:$29,687,500.00

 

4 Comments

  1. NANCY FLYNN on April 9, 2020 at 5:05 am

    HELLO JOE,
    ARE YOU AWARE THAT THE CITY OF FRESNO IS STILL SWEEPING CAMPS AND THEREFORE IS IGNORING THE CDC DIRECTIVE TO CEASE SWEEPING? INDEED, OUR HOMELESS ARE BEING ROUSTED OUT OF THEIR TENTS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT EVEN WITH RAIN POURING DOWN. OUR BOOTS ON THE GROUND ADVOCATES ARE OUT TRYING TO FEED AND HELP THE HOMELESS AS OUR POLITICIANS ARE SLEEPING SOUNDLY IN THEIR WARM BEDS. THERE IS NOT ENOUGH SHELTER FOR OUR HOMELESS…..AND NO, NOT ENOUGH ‘MOTEL ROOMS’ THAT WERE PROMISED BY THE GOVERNOR. YOUR HELP OR ADVICE WOULD BE APPRECIATED. THERE IS A WAR AGAINST THE HOMELESS HERE IN FRESNO. ALL OF ‘THIS’ EVEN THOUGH ONE OF OUR COUNCIL MEMBERS SITS ON THE GOVERNOR’S HOMELESS TASK FORCE….

    • Joe Colletti, PhD on April 22, 2020 at 7:36 am

      Hi Nancy – the nearly $2 million that the Fresno CoC, Fresno County, and City of Fresno received in emergency COVID-19 funds to get the most vulnerable homeless persons off the streets and into motels should be the focus as you know. Millions more dollars are coming this year to the Fresno CoC, Fresno County, and City of Fresno for follow-up services including street outreach, housing navigation, rental assistance, etc.

  2. Gregorio barbiza on April 22, 2020 at 7:07 am

    The response from the state was quick and effective on getting people experiencing homelessness off the streets. Emergency shelters increased the number of beds.
    However the money did just that get people off the street. We have all these people who would not at times be willing to come to shelter. An issue here is that we now have them where we can gather data that may help us help them but their is no money to offer these people the maximum services like navigation, case workers, etc. there is a need right now for additional funds to address with additional services.

    gregorio barboza

    • Joe Colletti, PhD on April 22, 2020 at 7:23 am

      There is a need for additional funds to provide additional services. One pot of state funds in the amount of $650 million have been recently awarded to counties, continuums of care, and cities with a general population of 300,000 or more is Homeless Housing, Assistance, and Prevention Program (HHAP). Applications were due February 15 and awards are being made as of April 1 on a rolling basis. Eligible activities include street outreach, housing navigation, shelters, navigation centers, and rental assistance. Another pot of funds in the amount of $750 million is tied to California Access to Housing Act and funds should be awarded by the end of the year. Assembly bill 3300, if signed into law, would provide $2 billion a year.

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